XIV: A Castle on a Mountain

Treasureparcel

XIV AKROPOLIS
Servitors: Parusur, Alpas, Apolion, Trapis, Aril, Ipakol, Iuar, Kilik, Kokolon, Laralos, Liriol, Nasi, Pliroky (Pliroki), Soterion.

The word on the outer edge of the square clearly relates to Acropolis, denoting a stronghold atop a hill or mountain, while the spirit name in the central cross is that of Parasur, whose name either comes from the Latin paras meaning ‘to provide,’ or the Hebrew פרס (peras), meaning ‘reward’ or ‘prize.’

The Vision

A small, brown, rocky mountain appeared in the midst of a ring of much higher blue-stoned peaks. As I regarded the scene, I saw four beams of light appear from each of the cardinal directions to merge at a central point close to the peak. When they vanished, a cavern filled with gems and treasure was briefly visible under the stone of the hilltop, which hosted an abandoned-looking castle. I followed a stony path towards the top and after a few moments found a stone on the floor with the Hebrew letters, פיוס written upon it. I bent down to pick it up and found it resistant to being prized free, but after a few seconds of grappling it with my fingers, came loose. I picked it up and headed towards the castle which had birds that appeared at once to be both ravens and vultures circling its parapets.

On reaching the castle, I saw a hole in the masonry of its porch, where a closed portcullis barred my entry. This, along with its general shape and high altitude made it seem passingly similar to the arena I saw in the vision of the Wild Animals, but it was by no means the same place. The hole in the wall, I noticed, was exactly the same shape as the stone with the writing on that I had pulled free of the pathway to the door, and upon slotting it into place, the portcullis opened and I was able to approach the large wooden doorway beyond and knock it. The door swung open to reveal a gloomy, stone-floored, circular vestibule that was empty and had no other doorways or passages from which I could pass. On entering, a black, ethereal spirit in the shape of a scorpion appeared. It uttered a nonsense-word that sounded like Usadandy or something similar, which forced me to stop in my steps. I found myself trapped in a room for a while with lots of strange faces and images including a man with a fox’s head appearing in its furnishings and ornaments until I decided to leave the vestibule and fly up to an upstairs chamber where I left a bone as an offering to the spirits that were clearly defending this place from curious explorers. My exchange was obviously received well, for on my descent to the entryway, I found the earth opening up to me, allowing me into the great treasure hoard that was hidden beneath the castle. I was permitted to take as much loot as my arms could carry before finding myself back in my home locking my newly gained wealth into a cabinet.

Notes

Considering the meaning of the spirit name Parasur in the central cross, which possibly means ‘reward’ or ‘prize’ and the presence of the spirit Kilik, whose name means ‘wealth,’ it is interesting to note that the meaning of the Hebrew word carved into the stone I gained entry to the castle with, פיוס (piyas) means ‘lottery.’ Both words seem relevant in the context of the exchange and reward that occurred in the vision with my offering being rewarded to a small portion of the vast wealth that lay beneath the castle. With its hidden treasures and guardian spirits who barred the way to them, there appears to be a classic ‘treasure-spirit’ scenario locked into this square. A previous working with this square proved it to be impossible to enter beyond its facades or outer edges too, as the following account shows.

The meditative experience didn’t yield the results I’d hoped for with the castle I’d hoped to revisit, but, on the verge of sleep—which having the square on your head stops you from falling fully into—I noticed the perspective change and the imagery become that which was not by my own design. This involved seeing myself flying high above the clouds with a human shape but crow’s wings, until I saw a castle on a high mountain jutting through the cloud. I headed there and found faceless medieval soldiers operating machinery of war, which appeared like wooden cannons (no metal). A voice quizzed me for a while, asking me questions that required a degree of analysis to answers, pulling deep honesty from my secret thoughts, before asking me who I wanted them to fire a cannonball at. I answered that there was no one I maligned enough to want to cause serious harm to.

While the soldiers on the roof in this vision didn’t appear to be treasure guardians as such, their presence appears pertinent to the person of the Lemegeton spirit Malphas, who appears as a crow, builds high towers, will send armed men to vanquish one’s foes and gladly receives sacrifices. Between both visions, elements of the character of this spirit appear to be present, with the name Alpas—which also appears in this square—possibly relating either to he or to his near-namesake Halphas, who also builds great towers and commands military matters but appears in the shape of a stock dove rather than a crow.

The word that sounded like Usadandy made little sense and analysing it in retrospect reveals nothing of use. It does however feature quite a lot of the letters present in the square, as does the word פיוס (lettered P I U S).

Other spirit names in the square that have not yet been analysed elsewhere include:

Kokolon – possibly from קעקע (koko) – ‘incision,’ ‘imprint,’ ‘tattoo,’ ‘mark branded into the skin.’ May relate to the Hebrew letters imprinted into the stone I found on the pathway to the castle.

Pliroki – difficult to trace. Mathers suggests may be Coptic for ‘burning up.’

Iuar – another difficult one. Closest match with any semantic relevance is the Latin iurandum, ‘an oath.’

III. A Pumpkin

Servitors: Apolion, Nascelon (Naskelon), Nasi, Afolop (Afokop), Kilik, Kokolon, Alpas, Ipakol.

The word found on the Square’s outer edges, KIKAION, comes from the Hebrew קיקיון (see Jonah 4:6-11), which relates to a gourd, which belongs to the same family¹ as the pumpkin.

The Vision

A tall cedar appeared on a brown, marshy, windswept landscape. In its boughs hung a pumpkin, which rocked violently in the wind. In the surrounding branches bells tinkled and electric lights hung, which grew dim with the stronger gusts. As I watched, the pumpkin in the tree rotated to reveal the carved face of a jack-o-lantern which I fully expected to find appearing in this vision. As soon as its ‘face’ was visible, the pumpkin rocked back and forth with such strength that it fell to the ground and smashed into hundreds of pieces. I looked down to inspect its ruin and saw black seeds amidst the slivers of orange flesh that had scattered over the marsh. Rotten hands emerged from the ground to grasp at the seeds, which they took into the earth with them. As I saw their hands return to the world below, I imagined the place their bearers resided in to be akin to Dante’s description of the Vestibule of Hell, where the grasping, self-serving, noncommittal souls dwelled. As I looked down, I saw that I had no physical form, and realised that this was the reason why I didn’t sink unto the earth to join the spirits beneath. Thinking this, I wondered how the huge tree stayed so perfectly upright in such terrain and perceived that it was because its roots ran deep into the bones of the earth.

With my attention coming back to the shard of pumpkin flesh, I saw that one of the pieces had the ‘eye’ of the jack-o-lantern in it. Then I saw another, and decided to wear the pieces over my face to construct a mask out of them. When I did this, a pale, translucent tunnel appeared, which I was prompted to follow through the marshy landscape. It led to a small village with two wind turbines on its edge, and a tall, wooden house with a wedge-shaped roof rising over it on a small hill. I flew up to one of its windows, where I noticed I now wore the form of a crow. At the window, a black figure awaited me, whose name formed in my mind as the image of a doll, which led to me perceiving his name to be Adolon. As I landed, he spoke to me with a harsh whisper, asking ‘do you have it?’ In response, I dropped one of the black pumpkin seeds into his hand. He devoured the seed and prompted me to do the same. I held a seed in my beak and listened to the spirit’s instructions on how to eat it. As I did so, I became aware of a faint kundalini response which came with an explanation from the spirit about what the seeds actually were. They were souls, he said, that one devours into one’s being just as one takes a soul into the body upon birth then passes out of it again upon death. After eating his seed, he thanked me and asked what I wished for in return. I told him I wished for an increase in daemonic and spiritual awakening in the world, but he denied this as it was beyond his capability to assist with and bade me to ask for something else. I stated that I did not have any great desire and was content to act as his intermediary. In response, he directed me to go to a castle that lay to the west (explaining that he was in the North) and speak with its tenant. This I did, where I found the castle to be entirely made of glass.

Inside, an old woman with grey skin, hair that was equally black and white and a face that had a large mouth but no eyes, greeted me. She explained that the crystalline castle represented clear sight, which she pointed out to be a great irony as she lived there but was blind. She stated she would allow me to take refuge there and visit whenever I wanted to. So, in human form, I entered and took residence in a small cell of stone and wood which was filled with a moderate collection of books. Before long, a face appeared in the square glass window of the blue metal door that barred entry to the room. It belonged to a spirit with a grief-stricken expression, who said ‘do open the door and let me in, would you.’ Having had many experiences in astral travel and at the edge of sleep where I am asked to ‘open the door’ and allow entities to enter something (myself, I assume), I refused and said ‘what is your name, wretched spirit?’ It replied, ‘I am called Doolas, for I am sorrowful.’ I opened the door slightly, still barring entry to the cell, and saw that its body was thin with starvation. Recognising the name of this spirit, I asked it to confirm more about its identity, asking ‘art thou Volac?’ At the mention of this name, the spirit grew furious and tried to grab one of the pumpkin seeds from me, which I now held one of in my hand, demanding that I gave it to him. In response, I slammed the door shut and it disappeared.

Then the vision began to fade and my mind grew still and silent. In this state, I grew aware of the Square I held in my right hand growing heavy, then felt something heavy in my left hand too and perceived that I was holding a book. In my mind’s eye I saw that it had a worn orange cover, with words that I could barely read marked all over it. Then, after scouring the cover, I found that I could just about make out the title, which was ‘The Historical Approach to Magic,’ and this is where the vision ended.

Due to the time of year, there was little chance for synchronicities involving pumpkins to present themselves. However, allowing YouTube to play recommended videos beforehand involved one in which a graphic of three pumpkins appeared while I was in the final stages of preparation.

The received name Adolon comes from the Greek ἄδολον, meaning ‘sincere,’ ‘true’ or ‘honest,’ while the similarly named Doolas is a Book of Offices cognate of the Lemegeton spirit Volac and has a likely etymological origin in the Latin Dolorosus, ‘painful’ or the Greek Δούλος, ‘slave.’ Notably, a phonetic variation of the name Volac appears in the Square with the spelling FOLAK, as does the English word ‘pain’ and the Greek PEINA (Πείνα), meaning ‘hunger’ or ‘starvation.’

Of the names of the servitors apparent in this Square, the most prominent is that of Apolion, whose name appears in the line spelling ONAPOLI. This name is derived from Apollyon, the Angel of the Abyss in the Book of Revelations, and means ‘destroyer.’ In the vision, the ‘destroyer’ was the great wind which caused the pumpkin to fall from the tree and disintegrate. Also present is the name Nascelon (here spelled Naskelon), which is reminiscent of the name of the Philistine city Ashkelon, which was denigrated in Zephaniah 2:4 for its prominent idolatry and was cited by Herodotus as being the site of the most ancient temple of the goddess Ashtoreth. The name Nasi derives from the Hebrew נשי meaning ‘womanly’ or ‘effeminate’ and may have been reflected in the feminine entities that appeared in both this and the vision of the Square relating to A Hunting Party. Another name that appeared in both this and the last Square, Kilik, possibly comes from the Hebrew חַיִל (khil) meaning ‘power,’ ‘strength,’ ‘bastion,’ ‘army’ and ‘wealth.’ This spirit may be an alias of the Grimorium Verum spirit Khil who is connected in function to the Lemegeton spirit Agares—whose name also appears in this square with the spelling Agaros—due to their shared ability to cause Earthquakes. The appearance of the spirit Alpas is also of note, as his Lemegeton cognate Malphas appears as a crow and causes the construction of houses and castles, which all form pertinent aspects of this vision. Other evident names include Kokolon, which has a possible origin in קלון (qlon) meaning ‘shame,’ ‘infamy,’ ‘disgrace,’ ‘prostitution,’ and Afolop, which may come from אפל (afol) meaning ‘dark,’ ‘leaden,’ ‘gloomy,’ ‘black,’ ‘dim,’ ‘obscure.’ With the alternative spelling Afokop found in this square, however, the latter of these two final names also has the additional meaning אפק (afoq) denoting ‘strength,’ ‘restraint’ or ‘a stronghold or fortress,’ and אופק (aofoq), meaning ‘vista’ or ‘horizon,’ to consider.


¹ Cucurbitaceae.

II. A Hunting Party

 

Wild Hunt

Servitors: Nagar, Gorilon, Liriol, Asorega, Alogil, Ragaras, Igilon, Sigis, Laralos, Gesegas, Nasi, Tolet, Igarag, Aril, Lagasas, Kilik, Kokolon, Isagas, Soterion, Negen.

The linguisitic origin of the word KINIGESIA found in the outer lines of the Square comes from the Greek κυνήγι, ‘hunting’ combined with the suffix -ησία (-esia) which denotes the condition, situation, process or action of something.
The Vision

As the sitting begun, the name ‘Asugul’ came through very quickly, followed by a vision of a mounted fox-hunting party on the bridge over the canal near the entrance of London Zoo. Their leader, a sharp-featured, menacing man whose flesh was corpse-like in hue, approached me aggressively, making me think for a moment that I was their pray and that I should flee, but I stood my ground. As he came closer, he remonstrated with me, saying ‘you’ve got one of them haven’t you?’ As he spoke, I sensed he was hunting something that had escaped him. Not knowing what he was talking about, I denied having whatever he was hunting, but thought he may have been pursuing a familiar spirit who had escaped his custody. Then, on hearing a word that sounded like ‘spray,’ I saw that one of the party had a golden osprey on its arm, which it released into the sky. I followed its course with my mind and saw the world below from its point of view, feeling saddened by the fact that the bird was attached to a long cord and wasn’t free to do its own will. Looking down from its high viewpoint, I saw that there was no trace of whatever it was that the party was looking for. Returning to ground level, I perceived the other huntsmen as a congregation of pallid-skinned creatures with large, bright, yellow eyes gathering around me. At the same time, I also sensed them manifesting in the room around me as small black spots of shadow clinging to the walls.

Then the setting changed to that of a forest, where I saw an old, bearded man clad in grey being sitting on the back of a horse-drawn cart. His left arm was covered in blood up to the elbow and he seemed unable to walk by himself, as if he’d been injured. From previous works, I recognised this man as one of the guises of the spirit Barbatos, a forest-dwelling spirit with links to hunting due to Weyer’s description of him as appearing in Signo sagittarii sylvestris, or ‘as a woodland archer.’ As the old man was led away into the distant forest, I saw his face quickly change into that of a bear, then a lion, then a ram, then a boar then finally a hare. As the cart disappeared down the track, I saw the leg and haunches of a white hare darting away from the scene. Some distance behind the cart came a collection of white-robed, hooded figures who eventually came to a stop at a bear trap and threw a shrouded, human-shaped body into it. Before I could see anything else, the scene faded into darkness in which a line of black women walked before me. One of them was very curious about the square in my hand and asked to see it. I consented and opened my hand, leaving it balancing on my palm for the rest of the session. After doing this, the last of the women, who bore beautiful, Egyptian features approached me and said ‘sit steadfast and see.’ After this, the forest reappeared and I now saw that the body in the pit was that of a bear, not a human, as if it had changed its form after being slain. Around its carcass, fur-clad men gathering around it to eat its flesh and absorb its strength.

This was the last thing I recall seeing in the vision, which began to grow hazy and filled with nonsense words and fleeting images. This signified the time had come to give up and end the session.

The next morning, I noted a curious synchronicity relating to two people, one of whom had the surname of an animal and the other had a surname which was one letter away from the name one of the spirits of the Lemegeton. For privacy reasons, those persons cannot be named here. The most curious aspect of the vision, from my perspective, was the immediate reception of the name Asugul, which seemed familiar but yielded no significant results when a cursory Google search was run, and bore no direct relation to any of the Servitors’ names. Analysing the structure of this name, however, I noted its similarity to words of Semitic origin such as the Hebrew Az, goat, and the Arabic Ghûl, ‘ghoul,’ which is a demonic entity that robs graves and feeds on corpses. More significant, maybe, was the phonological similarity of this word to the Babylonian Assaku and the Sumerian Asag, which were malicious spirits who attacked and killed human beings by means of disease. In conjunction with the word ghûl—or xul in its more ancient, Mesopotamian form—Asag forms the new word Asaghul or Asaxul which, in this scenario, relates to a class of spirits that bring death then feast on the flesh of the slain. This new word, given in this vision as the name Asugul, coincides strongly with the function of the huntsmen who pervaded the scene as well as the fate of the bear that was fed upon as it lay dead in the pit.