XXIV: Owls

Hermit

XXIV KIKIMIS
Servitors: Igarag, Mara, Liriol, Lomiol, Asorega, Asmiel, Alogil, Ragaras, Ismerek, Sarasim, Sigis, Girmil, Laralos, Gesegas, Kosem, Iparkas, Erimites, Tolet, Ramoras, Ekalak, Oroia, Romages, Geloma, Ilekel, Aril, Lagasas, Kilik, Isagas, Ipakol, Amillis.

The word KIKIMIS on the outer edges of the square comes from the Ancient Greek κικυμίς (kikumis) meaning ‘a screech owl.’ The name in the central square is that of the spirit Igarag, whose name means ‘frost,’ ‘ice’ or ‘cold.’

The Vision

A small, brown owl appeared sitting alone in a dead tree in a brightly lit but desolate landscape. Sitting in the daylight was painful to it, and caused it to muster its rage at the light, making the outer shell of the sun split into two to reveal a smaller, darker sun that was concealed inside of it. Then this sun split in half too, revealing a black neutron star it which cast no light at all,. With the coming of darkness, the landscape changed to that of a graveyard set in the midst of a circular grove of thirteen dead trees, and on each of these trees perched an owl similar to the one which darkened the sun. Then a voice came from one of the owls declaring that theirs was the time in which the dead would rise to walk the earth, and then, from each of the graves rose a foul revenant. Then, beams of light emanated from each of the owls, connecting them together to form a thirteen-sided star. In its centre stood a black, vertical column with the black star sitting at its pinnacle. I panned out of this scene to see the graveyard become a circular platform which the rising column stood in the centre of giving the landscape the appearance of a spinning top or kaleidoscope. As I noticed this similarity, it began to rotate, then spun faster and faster until the individual owls and trees became an invisible blur and combined their collective image into the vision of a single owl bearing a golden crown which was flying towards me. On its arrival at the edge of the blurred, spinning world it proceeded to try to tear at my eyes and face with its beak, but could not make physical contact due to its being contained within a world that I stood beyond.

Then, the scene changed entirely and I saw the entrance to a cave lying beyond a green marsh. I sensed that there was a bear or other wild animal inside, but on getting further inside I discovered a ruined old hermit in a blue robe wearing a gold crown who was weeping inconsolably. No words came from his mouth, and it couldn’t be determined why he was so mournful. As I approached him he cast himself into a hole in the stone which formed the gullet that lay between the mouth of the cave and a belly-like cavern below. I followed him into the cave’s gut and found him lying in a pile of crowns with sharp prongs that cut into his skin causing his pain to grow worse, though in the midst of his agony he stopped for a second to adjust his crown which sat askew on his head, as if to maintain his pride. Then, as he resumed his wailing, a slew of crowns came rushing down through the stone sphincter of the gullet above us and buried him beneath them, their sharpened prongs piercing his body with a thousand more wounds.

Then the scene changed again. It was night, and all was still and calm with a fresh, sweet-scented breeze. Atop a distant hill stood a windmill, its sails gliding gently through the air, and in a window at its top sat another owl, or perhaps the same one as before. I entered through the window and saw that the owl had moved inside to sit upon a wooden beam that spanned the top of a bare room with a wooden floor. Then the owl transformed its shape into that of a golden-haired woman wearing a blue dress. She climbed down from the beam and moved to a wooden crank-handle, which she turned to cause the sails of the windmill spin with a great speed, birthing a new wind in the air which travelled at speed across the land to the graveyard encircled by trees. All was peaceful there before the wind arrived, with no signs of the risen dead, and the owls slept upon their perches. But when the wind arrived, it disturbed them from their sleep and they woke as one and seemed to grow wrathful again. And this is where the vision ended.

Notes

The Screech Owl cited in the word KIKIMIS is one of the wilderness demons of the Hebrew tradition and an alternative Hebrew name for an owl is a ‘Lilith’ or a ‘night spirit.’ Their desire for darkness and apocalypse reflects their averse nature and their reverting to the form of a single owl after being separated into thirteen separate ones may reflect the numeration of the Hebrew word אחד (achad) – ‘unity.’

The name Erimities present in the square comes from the Greek ἐρημίτης (eremites), meaning ‘hermit.’ This appeared to relate to the appearance of the weeping old man who dwelt within the cave. His blue robe and gold crown are consistent with the colour scheme I’ve noted in previous spirit-work, which also manifested again in the female entity who appeared in the windmill with her blue dress and golden hair.

The servitor Iparkas might be related to the Livre des Esperitz spirit Parcas, known as Partas in the Book of Offices and Foras or Forcase in the Lemegeton. This spirit comes in the form of a fierce bear, a creature I thought I detected the presence of in the cave. He also reveals the location of hidden treasures which may account for the cavern full of golden crowns.

The square was constructed with the Moon at 16º Libra with the sound of owls filling the midnight air, and was performed with the Moon at 17º Scorpio.

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