XII. Paddocks and Fields

Death horse

XII JAGEB

Servitors: Gesegas, Sigis, Isagas, Igarag.

The word at the outer edges of the Square, IAGEB/JAGEB, may be formed from the root עגב (ageb), signifying ‘lust’ or ‘lovers,’ while the name formed in the central cross is that of the spirit Gesegas, which may derive from a palindromic expression of געש (ges) – ‘eruption,’ ‘quaking,’ ‘storm,’ with the common demonic suffix ‘gas’ also resembling this word (as ga’as).’

The Vision

A ghastly horse appeared before me in an open, frost-covered field beneath a bright moonlight sky. The horse was thin and almost skeletal in appearance with what appeared to be horns protruding from its head where its ears should have been. It made a request that I ride with it, which I accepted. We headed off by flying over scenery similar to that of the English countryside where we followed a small pack of hounds, were chasing something through some fields which were bordered by trees. The horse descended to the earth as the hounds caught their quarry and I saw them tearing at the spectral form of an old woman who was suffering greatly. She had escaped her perdition, I was informed, and the hounds who were hunting her would now take her back to her prison. The horse then instructed me to take hold of the woman and position her in front of me. I did this and received an impression of the soul I had gathered having died of natural causes after living an unremarkable life, the nothingness and triviality of which was being repaid to her in the form of unending restriction.

With the hounds’ baying and breath vapours filling the air, they disappeared into a shroud of mist as the horse and I flew through the skies to return to an area close to where I had first seen it appear. We landed at the edge of a graveyard, where I asked the horse its name. The name Orobas formed in my head due that spirit’s appearance being that of a horse, but this was denied. ‘I am more of the nature of fire,’ it explained. On further prompting it gave the name Melenhor, which I rejected as this was the name of a familiar I was given by the spirit Buer who I eventually dismissed for being troublesome a few years ago. It confirmed, however, that this was so.

It stated it was now in the service of the spirit Bune and worked with her to reclaim souls who had escaped the temporary reprieve they were occasionally granted whereby they could return to places they knew in life for a while in order to remember and reflect upon them. It then told me that with me having now been blooded, I would receive a boon in the powers of necromancy. Then, in the graveyard we were stood next to, a small congregation of the dead could be seen, all pale and ethereal like the woman we had captured, who was now being dragged away to some terrible place. Leading this congregation was a black-robed figure with its back to me and arms outstretched in the shape of a cross. With its departure, the vision ended.

Because of its theme, there was an obvious overlap with this square’s vision and that which related to A Hunting Party which began with a huntsman upon a horse and featured all four of this square’s servitors within its host. Of these, Igarag was the most apparent here due to his name’s meaning relating to ‘frost,’ ‘ice’ and ‘cold’ and the ground in the vision was covered in frost and the breath of the hunting hounds was visible in the air. The sense of restriction and perdition suffered by the souls of the dead, as well as constraining aspects of the hunters may be symbolised by the name of the spirit Sigis, which means ‘restriction.’

2 thoughts on “XII. Paddocks and Fields

  1. […] On being reincarnated back into a physical form, the ‘death cycle’ of the visions appeared to come to an end, with the stag representing the incarnated soul, as it does in alchemy, whereas the Unicorn represented pure spirit. The Earthy, masculine nature of the Stag seemed to concur with this, with my reborn self taking on qualities of renewed power and vigour in the material world, with my form being feeling somewhat akin to that of Cernunnos or Herne on my return, which also paralleled the mythos of the Wild Hunt that has been apparent in visions such as that of A Hunting Party and Paddocks and Fields. […]

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