VII. A Big Lake

 

misty_lake_display

VII AGAMAGA

Servitors: Alogil, Amillis, Aril, Asorega, Asmiel, Geloma, Gesegas, Gorilon, Igarag, Isagas, Lagasas, Laralos, Liriol, Lomiol, Mara, Morilon, Myrmo (Mirmo), Oroia, Ragaras, Ramoras, Romages, Romoron, Sarasim, Sigis.

The word AGAMAGA at the outer edge of the square is a palindromic expression of the Hebrew אגם (agam), ‘lake,’ while the word forming the central cross relates to the spirit Morilon, whose name relates to the Latin Mori, ‘to decay,’ ‘die,’ ‘wither,’ ‘fade away’ ‘be forgotten.’ Although the Squares as a whole are not without errors of transmission, the fact that the letters in the square are not always perfectly symmetrical should not necessarily be considered as evidence of flaws, as the expression of the ‘titles’ of the square and of the spirit names contained within it—especially the spirit featured in the central cross—are more vital to their operations than lexicographical symmetry.

The Vision

This vision began with a voice from the darkness speaking the words ‘white wine,’ before the image of a golf club was seen striking a golf ball that lay on a lawn to send it flying a long distance away to splash into a lake. Looking down at the lake from above, I saw that it was still and shrouded in mist. I descended upon it and found myself in a small coracle-like boat armed with only a short paddle to navigate its expanses with. As I rowed at a ponderous rate, I became aware of large, placid fish swimming close to the surface and knew that there were hoards of treasure abandoned by wrecked ships on the lake’s floor. I realised, from this, that the lake must have been very large if trade ships sailed over it, so rose up over the scene to take stock of its scope and found myself on the edge of space before I could see all of its shores.

Left bobbing slowly on the vast lake, I found myself wishing that my boat had an engine but realised that although I knew such things existed, they didn’t exist in the world I was experiencing this vision in. It was then that I became aware of a deep, low rumbling noise, like that of a large earthquake, coming from the bottom of the lake. I grew afraid that I would be devoured by a tsunami, so looked around for some kind of refuge, should one come. Doing this, I saw a small island of shale rising up from the surface a short distance away so headed for it and climbed to its top in case the great tidal wave I expected came. At the summit, the shale slid away to reveal a large, lidless eye that was embedded within a toe where the toenail should have been. Attempting to avoid its gaze, I walked around to the back of the eye-toe but saw, from a third-party perspective, that the eye had rotated a full one-hundred and eighty degrees to keep following. I continued in my circle and witnessed the eye complete its rotation with me. With no more deep rumbles coming from the bed of the lake and feeling more afraid of the toe than of the tsunami in any case, I got back in my boat and continued rowing.

After a short time, I saw a large galleon sailing towards me. As it approached, I saw that its crewmen all had the faces of lobsters and shrimps—unclean animals in Judaism—whose gaze followed me in the same way that the eye on the island had. As the ship had almost passed, the last of its crewmen pointed out the direction in which I should sail, doing so as if he needed to keep his actions secret from the rest of his shipmates. Taking his advice, I altered my course until I came to some rocks. After reaching the shore and realising I had not been tricked into wrecking my boat and becoming stranded, I hauled my small vessel onto my shoulder and reached solid land. On the shore I saw the back of a scarecrow that I recognised as a mute, motionless ferryman who I had borrowed a boat from in a previous vision. This vision was experienced during a work which utilised the first square of Book IV Chapter IV of the Abramelin, which is used to create visions in mirrors, glass and crystals. Such was the scarecrow’s redundancy of power that a crow rested fearlessly on his shoulder, but I laid the boat at his feet anyway, noticing as I moved away from it that it now had a pumpkin for a head.

Moving inland, I had a flash of a vivid spirit with the head of a leopard. It called me ‘Bob’ and said words that sounded similar to ‘fonscor scollion,’ which made no sense to me at all. Then the image of the leopard-headed entity faded and I saw a dragon flying towards me over the lake. In fear, once again, that I would suffer harm from, I stood my ground and waited as it flew in to speak with me. It repeated the words I had heard at the beginning of the vision: ‘white wine,’ with which came the image of a chalice with a devil’s head carved upon it. Then the dragon spoke again.

‘When you drink this, you drink his guile and his wisdom,’ it said, then flew away.

As it departed, the pall that had hung over the lake lifted, revealing a bright sunset. From the position of the sun, I realised that the dragon had come from the south and was heading north. I thought of heading into its waters to retrieve the treasures I had sensed lying beneath its surface, but was prevented from doing so by a feeling of trepidation. Then, with the impression of a net of some kind being cast, the vision ended.

The leopard that appeared reminded me of the form of the spirits Haures, Sitri and Ose in the Lemegeton, and on inspecting the square, the name of the spirit Ose—who comes under the power of Amaymon, the King of the South, in the Book of Offices—is clearly represented in it. The phrase it spoke, ‘fonscor scollion,’ made little sense at the time, but may have been a transmission of the following Latin and Greek words: Fons – ‘fresh water,’ ‘a spring or fountain,’ ‘a source,’ ‘a well;’ Cor – ‘heart,’ or ‘soul,’ ‘mind;’ and Scolion – a type of Greek lyric poetry performed as a drinking song accompanied by a lyre. In combination with the appearance of the dragon advising me to drink the white wine that was mentioned at the beginning of the vision from a chalice with a devil’s head carved into, I believe this was an instruction of how rites to a certain spirit should be performed.

I feel this spirit may be Egin, the King of the North, who rides on a dragon. That the dragon flew away in the direction is relevant, but also telling, perhaps, are the names of two of the spirits that appear in this square and the name of one of Egin’s attendant spirits. The square’s servitors Ramoras and Romages have names that may equate to the Hebrew root word רעם (Ra’am), meaning ‘thunder’ ‘rumble,’ or ‘boom’ which account for the deep tremors I felt emanating from the bottom of the lake. Mathers, however, suggests that the former of these names related to the word ramaratz, meaning ‘raised ground’ which might relate to the mound of shale that appeared in the midst of the lake.

This possible etymology is also reflected in the name of the spirit Rodabell or Radabelbes, who is one of the servants of Egin in the Book of Offices. This name, like the ones mentioned above, relates to a Hebrew word רעדב (ra’adab), which has the meaning ‘tremor,’ and thus fits with the deep, rumbling quake that I felt and heard pervading the early parts of this vision. Considering this, it is possible that the dragon, which is the creature that Egin rides, that came was the mount and servant of that King delivering instructions on how to pay him homage.

With the North Solstice and the sun’s entry into Cancer, the sign of Cardinal Water approaching, an experiment will be made on that day to test these theories.

Other spirit names that appeared in this square and their meanings are:

Geloma – גלום (gelom) – ‘personification’ or ‘embodiment.’
Lomiol – לעמול (lomul) – ‘work,’ ‘toil’, ‘travail,’ ‘make effort,’ ‘take pains.’
Moreh – מרה (moreh), ‘bile,’ ‘gall.’
Romoron – from Latin Remoror, ‘delay,’ ‘linger,’ ‘loiter,’ ‘hold back,’ ‘hinder,’ ‘remain quiet.’
Asmiel – ‘destroyer,’ or ‘wrath’ of God. Possible truncation of Asmodiel, King of the East on the Grimoire of Honorius.

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