II. A Hunting Party

 

Wild Hunt

Servitors: Nagar, Gorilon, Liriol, Asorega, Alogil, Ragaras, Igilon, Sigis, Laralos, Gesegas, Nasi, Tolet, Igarag, Aril, Lagasas, Kilik, Kokolon, Isagas, Soterion, Negen.

The linguisitic origin of the word KINIGESIA found in the outer lines of the Square comes from the Greek κυνήγι, ‘hunting’ combined with the suffix -ησία (-esia) which denotes the condition, situation, process or action of something.
The Vision

As the sitting begun, the name ‘Asugul’ came through very quickly, followed by a vision of a mounted fox-hunting party on the bridge over the canal near the entrance of London Zoo. Their leader, a sharp-featured, menacing man whose flesh was corpse-like in hue, approached me aggressively, making me think for a moment that I was their pray and that I should flee, but I stood my ground. As he came closer, he remonstrated with me, saying ‘you’ve got one of them haven’t you?’ As he spoke, I sensed he was hunting something that had escaped him. Not knowing what he was talking about, I denied having whatever he was hunting, but thought he may have been pursuing a familiar spirit who had escaped his custody. Then, on hearing a word that sounded like ‘spray,’ I saw that one of the party had a golden osprey on its arm, which it released into the sky. I followed its course with my mind and saw the world below from its point of view, feeling saddened by the fact that the bird was attached to a long cord and wasn’t free to do its own will. Looking down from its high viewpoint, I saw that there was no trace of whatever it was that the party was looking for. Returning to ground level, I perceived the other huntsmen as a congregation of pallid-skinned creatures with large, bright, yellow eyes gathering around me. At the same time, I also sensed them manifesting in the room around me as small black spots of shadow clinging to the walls.

Then the setting changed to that of a forest, where I saw an old, bearded man clad in grey being sitting on the back of a horse-drawn cart. His left arm was covered in blood up to the elbow and he seemed unable to walk by himself, as if he’d been injured. From previous works, I recognised this man as one of the guises of the spirit Barbatos, a forest-dwelling spirit with links to hunting due to Weyer’s description of him as appearing in Signo sagittarii sylvestris, or ‘as a woodland archer.’ As the old man was led away into the distant forest, I saw his face quickly change into that of a bear, then a lion, then a ram, then a boar then finally a hare. As the cart disappeared down the track, I saw the leg and haunches of a white hare darting away from the scene. Some distance behind the cart came a collection of white-robed, hooded figures who eventually came to a stop at a bear trap and threw a shrouded, human-shaped body into it. Before I could see anything else, the scene faded into darkness in which a line of black women walked before me. One of them was very curious about the square in my hand and asked to see it. I consented and opened my hand, leaving it balancing on my palm for the rest of the session. After doing this, the last of the women, who bore beautiful, Egyptian features approached me and said ‘sit steadfast and see.’ After this, the forest reappeared and I now saw that the body in the pit was that of a bear, not a human, as if it had changed its form after being slain. Around its carcass, fur-clad men gathering around it to eat its flesh and absorb its strength.

This was the last thing I recall seeing in the vision, which began to grow hazy and filled with nonsense words and fleeting images. This signified the time had come to give up and end the session.

The next morning, I noted a curious synchronicity relating to two people, one of whom had the surname of an animal and the other had a surname which was one letter away from the name one of the spirits of the Lemegeton. For privacy reasons, those persons cannot be named here. The most curious aspect of the vision, from my perspective, was the immediate reception of the name Asugul, which seemed familiar but yielded no significant results when a cursory Google search was run, and bore no direct relation to any of the Servitors’ names. Analysing the structure of this name, however, I noted its similarity to words of Semitic origin such as the Hebrew Az, goat, and the Arabic Ghûl, ‘ghoul,’ which is a demonic entity that robs graves and feeds on corpses. More significant, maybe, was the phonological similarity of this word to the Babylonian Assaku and the Sumerian Asag, which were malicious spirits who attacked and killed human beings by means of disease. In conjunction with the word ghûl—or xul in its more ancient, Mesopotamian form—Asag forms the new word Asaghul or Asaxul which, in this scenario, relates to a class of spirits that bring death then feast on the flesh of the slain. This new word, given in this vision as the name Asugul, coincides strongly with the function of the huntsmen who pervaded the scene as well as the fate of the bear that was fed upon as it lay dead in the pit.

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